Border Agreement Between India And Bangladesh

The enclaves of India-Bangladesh, also known as chimaterial (Bengal: ছিট惔হল chimaterial[1][2][3][4]) and sometimes also pasha enclaves,[5] were enclaves along the border between Bangladesh and India, in Bangladesh and in the Indian states of West Bengal, Tripura, Assam and Meghalaya. In the main body of Bangladesh were 102 enclaves of Indian territory, which in turn contained 21 Bangladeshi counter-slaves, one of which contained an Indian counter-enclave – the only third-order enclave in the world. Inside mainland India were 71 Bangladeshi enclaves containing 3 Indian counter-slaves. A 2010 joint census found that 51,549 people lived in these enclaves: 37,334 in Indian enclaves in Bangladesh and 14,215 in Bangladeshi enclaves in India. [3] [6] The land border agreement was concluded on May 14, 1974, Indira Gandhi and Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, who announced the exchange of enclaves and the surrender of harmful goods. [17] Under the agreement, India retained the Berubari Union No. 12 enclave, while Bangladesh retained the Dahagram-Angorpota enclaves, with India having access to them by providing a 178-metre by 85-metre corridor (584 feet × 279 feet) called the Tin Bigha Corridor. Bangladesh quickly ratified the agreement in 1974, but India did not. The issue of the undemarcated land boundary of about 6.1 kilometers (3.8 miles) in three sectors – Daikhata-56 in West Bengal, Muhuri River-Belonia in Tripura and Lathitila-Dumabari in Assam – has also not been resolved. The Tin Bigha corridor was leased to Bangladesh in 1992 against local resistance.

[3] Dhaka Foreign Minister Abul Hassan Mahmood Ali called the updated agreement “a historic milestone in relations between the two South Asian neighbors.” Under the agreement, each country assumes sovereignty over all enclaves in its territory. Residents can choose to live in India or Bangladesh and obtain citizenship accordingly. India will hand over 51 enclaves of 7,110 acres to Bangladesh and receive 111 enclaves with a total area of 17,160 acres from Bangladesh. The total number of people affected by this agreement is about 51,000. (Bangladesh, India in Historic Land Swap After Almost 4 Decades, above.) As part of the deal signed in Dhaka in the presence of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Bangladeshi counterpart Sheikh Hasina, the two countries will exchange about 200 tiny enclaves around the border. . . .